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August 2015 Policy Study, Number 15-7

   

The Impact of Self-Objectification on Political Efficacy: Does Self-Image Affect Feelings of Political Adequacy

   

References

   

 

Archer, D., Iritani, B., Kimes, D. D., & Barrios, M. (1983). Face-ism: Five Studies of Sex Differences in Facial Prominence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 45(4), pp. 725-735.


Atkeson, L. R., & Carrillo, N. (2007). More is Better: The Influence of Collective Female Descriptive Representation on External Efficacy. Politics and Gender(3), pp. 79-101.


Campbell, D. E., & Wolbrecht, C. (2006, May). See Jane Run: Women Politicians as Role Models for Adolescents. The Journal of Politics, 68(2), 233-247.


CAWP. (1999). Women in State Legislatures 1999. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Center for American Women and Politics: Eagleton Institute of Politics, New Brunswick, NJ. Retrieved September 12, 2014, from http://www.cawp.rutgers.edu/fast_facts/levels_of_office/documents/stleg99.pdf


CAWP. (2014). Women in State Legislatures 2015. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Center for American Women and Politics: Eagleton Institute of Politics, New Brunswick, NJ. Retrieved from Expanding Leadership Opportunities for Women Veterans: http://cawp.rutgers.edu/footnotes/


Craig, S. C., Niemi, R. G., & Silver, G. E. (1990, September). Political Efficacy and Trust: A Report on the NES Pilot Study Items. Political Behavior, 12(3), 289-314.


Forrest, A. L., & Weseley, A. J. (2007). To Vote or Not to Vote? An Exploration of the Factors Contributing to the Political Efficacy and Intent to Vote of High School Students. Journal of Social Studies Research, 31, pp. 3-11.


Fredrickson, B. L., & Roberts, T.-A. (1997). Objectification Theory: Toward Understanding Women's Lived Experiences and Mental Health Risks. Psychology of Women Quarterly(21), pp. 173-206.


Fredrickson, B. L., Roberts, T.-A., Noll, S. M., Quinn, D. M., & Twenge, J. M. (1998). The Swimsuit Becomes You: Sex Differences in Self-Objectification, Restrained Eating, and Math Performance. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 25(1), pp. 269-284.


Fu, H., Mou, Y., Miller, M. J., & Jalette, G. (2011). Reconsidering Political Cynicism and Political Involvement: A Test of Antecedents. American Communication Journal, 13(2), pp. 44-60.


Heldman, C., & Wade, L. (2011, August). Sexualizing Sarah Palin: The Social and Political Context of the Sexual Objectification of Female Candidates. Sex Roles, 65(3/4).


Lawless, J. L., & Fox, R. L. (2004). Why Don't Women Run for Office. Brown University. Taubman Center for Public Policy.


McKinley, N. M., & Hyde, J. S. (1996). The Objectified Body Consciousness Scale. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 181-215.


Niemi, R. G., Craig, S. C., & Mattei, F. (1991, December). Measuring Internal Political Efficacy in the 1988 National Election Study. American Political Science Review, 85(4), 1407-1413.


Pinkleton, B. E., & Austin, E. W. (2004). Media Perceptions and Public Affairs Apathy in the Politically Inexperienced. Mass Communication and Society, 7, 319-337.


Pinkleton, B. E., Austin, E. W., & Fortman, K. K. (1998). Relationships of Media Use and Political Disaffection to Political Efficacy and Voting Behavior. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media(42), pp. 34-49.


Pinkleton, B. E., Austin, E. W., & Fortman, K. K. (1998). Relationships of Media Use and Political Disaffection to Political Efficacy and Voting Behavior. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, pp. 34-49.


Pollock, P. H. (1983, September). The Participatory Consequences of Internal and External Political Efficacy: A Research Note. The Western Political Quarterly, 36(3), 400-409.


(2013). Women in State Legislatures: 2013 Legislative Session. National Conference of State Legislatures, Women's Legislative Network of NCSL. Retrieved September 12, 2014, from http://www.ncsl.org/legislators-staff/legislators/womens-legislative-network/women-in-state-legislatures-for-2013.aspx

 

   

 

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